Session Descriptions for 2018 AZ Historic Preservation Conference
It’s About “TIME” – Thursday, June 7 Opening Keynote Presentation

It’s About “TIME” – Thursday, June 7 Opening Keynote Presentation

Design in the desert is demanding. There are rules. Although, often perceived as hostile and tough, to the contrary, the Sonoran landscape is fragile. It takes a long time to repair damage caused by a misguided built environment. But, given time, the desert will repair and, in the process, EAT our buildings! Rather than dwell on the consequence of insensitive dwelling, this presentation celebrates the modern influence of indigenous architecture, desert forum, and the continued validity of native passive principles, historic materials, and nature...our best design partner. Through visual examples ranging from Pueblo Casa Grande to Taliesin West to Cosanti to the work of Jones Studio, artists and the Hopi, attendees will learn and appreciate how a desert inspires its own unique architecture. All examples are well-known, many historic and each sets a high standard defining levels of knowledge, respect and desert responsiveness.
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The Prehistory Of “Pueblo Style” – Friday, June 8 Luncheon Keynote

The Prehistory of “Pueblo Style” – Friday, June 8 Luncheon Keynote

Archaeology was present at the creation of "Pueblo Style." At the turn of the 19th century, Santa Fe was small, dusty, and decrepit. When Duke City boosters suggested moving New Mexico's Capital to modern, progressive Albuquerque, the city fathers of the City Different – with archaeologists at the fore – fought back and marketed Santa Fe with culture: first, Conquistadors and; when Spain didn't sell, with Pueblo Style. The old Spanish fogones became "kiva fireplaces" and faux vigas bristled from every roofline. It worked: Santa Fe retained the Capital and became a Pueblo theme park. Pueblo Style was more than architecture; indeed, it dominates narratives of regional prehistory, recursively influencing archaeology – originally, its major inspiration. This presentation tells the story of people, institutions, and ideas that created Pueblo Style, with particular attention to how it distorts our notions of the region's ancient history.
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The State Historic Preservation Plan Update 2019

The Arizona State Historic Plan Update 2019 identifies issues relevant to historic preservationists, presents goals and objective for how to achieve success in cultural resource preservation, and links state historic preservation goals with those of partners such as municipalities, federal and state agencies, tribes, and private organizations. Staff of the State Historic Preservation Office will present the findings and goals of the draft plan document and facilitate a discussion with audience members to seek insights and suggestions on the future of historic preservation in Arizona. The draft plan will be available online to conference attendees ahead of the conference.
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Sustainable Design in the Desert: Preserving Historic Character with Building Performance

The City of Scottsdale developed its green building program to “encourage energy efficient, healthy, and environmentally responsible building in the Sonoran desert region.” These guidelines encourage the revitalization of neighborhoods through remodeling and rehabilitating buildings using green building and energy efficiency principles and best practices. Scottsdale’s green building standards cover a variety of areas including site, landscaping, water conservation, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, kitchen/bathroom remodels and additions and enclosures – objectives that mesh comfortably with preservation and reuse goals. Learn about desert responsive strategies that minimize environmental impacts while preserving historic character.
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Learning from Our Legacies… Opportunistic Design Strategies from Doorways to Parkways

Holly Street Studio has worked within the Sonoran desert for nearly two decades at a multiplicity of scales. From singular spaces to whole cities, we have striven to bring sensible concepts to the full range of our work. Two of our most recent projects exemplify this. Our Phoenix College renovation to a 1969 Ralph Haver building attempts to balance the need for contemporary building technologies and social spaces within the beautiful bones of an historic landmark. At the larger end of the spectrum, our recent work on the City of Scottsdale Public Space Masterplan, Civic Center and Waterfront Park has posed different, yet similar challenges. Our session aims to demonstrate the poetic and practical opportunities for embracing past aesthetics. For better or worse, mid-century modernism almost singularly defined the architectural vocabulary of Phoenician high design. This strong initial influence has waned in prominence as our cultural tendencies have shifted away from contextual response in the new century. We must bring new values and philosophies to time-tested ideas if we are to carry this valuable legacy of design in the desert forward. If we fail in building upon this history, Phoenix runs the very real risk of becoming a cultural desert as well as a physical desert.
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Exploring a Historic Native Vernacular

The Indigenous Scholars Institute at Scottsdale Community College strives to serve a purpose that is often missing in buildings being constructed today. There is a vernacular to our land, to the people who inhabit it, to the way we build, and to the way we engage with one another. With the universal progress that we see happening today, it is easy to forget where we have been. The building serves as a reminder and a moment in the understanding of the SRP-MIC community that invites users to take a moment to pause and discuss, if even just for a moment, where we are, where we have been and where we are going. The design was created with the intention that the building would create a snapshot of the current-day understanding of where the SRP-MIC community is heading, where they are and where they have been. The space was created with many elements that evoke memories for some and provoke questions for others while preserving the legacy of native oral traditions. Utilizing the historical building methodologies and traditions such as orientation and material appropriateness, the Indigenous Scholars Institute reinterpreted and provided a point of reflection while remaining open to a new presence and future in the assimilated community.
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Sustainable Design in the Desert: Preserving Historic Character with Building Performance

The City of Scottsdale developed its green building program to “encourage energy efficient, healthy, and environmentally responsible building in the Sonoran desert region.” These guidelines encourage the revitalization of neighborhoods through remodeling and rehabilitating buildings using green building and energy efficiency principles and best practices. Scottsdale’s green building standards cover a variety of areas including site, landscaping, water conservation, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, kitchen/bathroom remodels and additions and enclosures – objectives that mesh comfortably with preservation and reuse goals. Learn about desert responsive strategies that minimize environmental impacts while preserving historic character. The City’s publication entitled “Green Building: Home Remodel Guidelines for Sustainable Building in the Sonoran Desert” are meant to supplement preservation guidelines for each of the City’s designated historic districts. It is important to place the preservation objectives for Scottsdale’s 1950’s and 1960’s homes in the context of 21st Century’s changing demographics, lifestyles, technologies coupled with the need for resource conservation and sustainability. Preservation guidelines for Scottsdale’s residential historic districts address elements compatible with the Scottsdale’s green building principles.
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Desert View Watchtower – Derivative Design and Inspired Collaboration: Perspectives from the Past and Present (Parts I and II)

The Desert View Watchtower, a National Historic Landmark at Grand Canyon National Park, provides perspectives of the Southwest, deriving from the use of Native American values by architect Mary Colter in her design and presentation, including the use of murals by Native American artists. The passage of time and ever-changing standards continue to influence activities at the Watchtower and greater Desert View area with the proposed development of Desert View as an Inter-tribal Heritage Site. Because of episodes of water infiltration in the five-story Desert View Watchtower, the interior murals by Fred Kabotie, Fred Geary, and Chester Dennis underwent recent conservation activities. In this presentation, Mary Colter and Fred Kabotie’s Watchtower murals are highlighted, as well as the ongoing conservation efforts. A discussion panel at the end of the session will include Ed Kabotie [grandson of Fred Kabotie], conservators, and other involved National Park Service personnel [e.g., historical architect, tribal liason].
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Sustainable Design: Starting With What We Already Have

Sustainable Design: Starting with What We Already Have

Sustainable design requires the integration of natural and cultural resources. An understanding of the role played by the adaptive reuse of historic buildings and the associated rehabilitation of historic streetscapes and green space provides a rich and sustainable context for creative place making. This session will explore the role of cultural resources in sustainable planning and community design. Several relevant case studies will be presented.
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Curation Design in the 21st Century

Changes in laws, funding, and technology have had a significant impact on archaeological curation facilities. Today’s Arizona museums have had to adapt traditional collection models and design new methods to accommodate massive electronic data sets, sampled collections, and creative storage schemes, all for less money than ever before. This forum presents perspectives from curators of several of Arizona’s museums.
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The Archaeology of Design: Evaluating the Significance and Integrity of the “Overlooked Site”

How do we recognize the integrity of design as it relates to an archaeological property? Is design purely deliberate and intentional, as we may perceive in pueblos, pit houses, or kivas, or can design be the "unintentional" result of intentional human activity at a limited-activity site? National Register Bulletin 36 stresses importance of thoroughly evaluating small, surface, or otherwise "overlooked" non-architectural sites as sources of significant information. Utilizing established guidance, this session explores the integrity of design, its relationship to the other aspects of integrity and the National Register Criteria, and its importance in the evaluation of archaeological sites where surface or subsurface features may be absent.
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Reuse And Adaptation As A Catalyst For Local Development

Reuse and Adaptation As a Catalyst for Local Development

This presentation gathers local development and architecture practitioners responsible for some of the Phoenix metro's most unique and iconic adaptive reuse. Presenters will share specific completed projects, and discuss the financing, permitting, zoning, and community outreach concerns they have encountered and resolved. The discussion will center upon adaptive reuse as being a key economic development strategy for cities of all sizes, and an essential opportunity in fostering culturally- and community-responsive sense of place. As cities across the state create and adjust adaptive reuse policies, we examine what works, and what still needs to exist for reuse and preservation to flourish.
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How We Did It: The Campaign For Arizona’s First Neon Sign Park

How We Did It: The Campaign for Arizona’s First Neon Sign Park

Casa Grande Main Street garnered a 2nd Place Win and $144,000 grant in a national online voting campaign sponsored by the National Trust and American Express to build a Neon Sign Park in Historic Downtown. Learn how old-fashioned grass roots strategies coupled with leveraging social media, local influentials and state partnerships established early momentum to a strong finish. Updates on design development and lessons learned in the process will bring you up to speed on this exciting project.
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Mid-Century Modern Scottsdale: From Farm Town to Fabulous During the 1950s

Scottsdale during the Fabulous Fifties was fun, fashionable, forward-thinking, funky and full of opportunities. What remains from 1950s Scottsdale is now considered Mid-Century Modern retro-cool, and is a tribute to the Greatest Generation and their Baby Boomer offspring who changed Scottsdale from a dusty farm town to a world-renown desert destination. Scottsdale Community Historian Joan Fudala will immerse attendees in a photo-rich time travel back to Scottsdale in the 1950s, then fast-forward to a look at Scottsdale's Mid-Century legacies that continue to attract residents, visitors and businesses today.
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Research Design and Best Practices – Creative Sampling Strategies for Archaeological Site Testing

Testing an archaeological site involves the destructive or non-destructive examination of material below the ground surface to characterize subsurface deposits and address specific research questions or goals. Characterizations typically include observations of sediment types, stratigraphy, and the abundance, type, and distribution of cultural materials. Typical research goals include whether the tested area represents an archaeological site, whether cultural materials possess significance and integrity to qualify as a historic property, or developing strategies for more extensive excavation.
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Celebrating Community:  Successful Tools For Preserving Historic Buildings’ Fabric

Celebrating Community: Successful Tools for Preserving Historic Buildings’ Fabric

We can create historic districts and local overlays to protect the built environment of a City’s past. Do we raise our fist and shout success? Hold on! The historic character and integrity have been marked, but now we must begin the longer game of maintaining it. By energizing historic communities, whether designated or not, through knowledge of their buildings’ fabric in a desert climate and simple tools of interaction, we can gain a wealth of knowledgeable advocates for retaining our built environments. By exploring these preservation tools of success in the City of Mesa, attendees will learn hands-on, practical tools they themselves can use to achieve similar success in their hometowns.
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One Building, 83 Years, Four Reincarnations, The Natural History Institute in Prescott, Arizona

This presentation is an exploration of the adaptive reuse of the original native granite church built by a local congregation in 1935. The current use as a Natural History Institute demonstrates the advantages of the principles of preserving significant historic fabric and features while designing modern improvements that are reversible and do not destroy original elements. William Otwell, FAIA, was commissioned to rehabilitate the structure in 1983 as a Tax Act project for use as executive offices. In 2013, the architect was commissioned to create a new environment by removing some of the 1983 components to bring the building back to the original in some areas, and provide for the new use.
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1950s – 1970s Contemporary Desert Architecture: Talented Yet Forgotten Architects

1950s – 1970s Contemporary Desert Architecture: Talented Yet Forgotten Architects

During the 1950s through the 1970s Arizona attracted many talented architects from elsewhere as they found the severe conditions of the desert, hot temperatures and intense sunlight appealing at creating an architecture that must be responsive to these challenges. They were keenly aware of the importance of well-insulated building envelopes, shading strategies, exploiting local construction materials, and utilizing available building skills. Despite their proven skills in this earlier era many have been forgotten. Let's refresh our memories about some of these architects and their work; and they include J. John Schotanus, Jr., P. E. Buchli, Thomas S. Montgomery, Pierson Miller Ware, Allan & Olsson, George Schoneberger, Jr. and others.
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AAC Panel Discussion: How to Apply Tenets of Modernism – Function, Simplicity, Rationality, and Elegance of Design – to the Cultural Resources Compliance Process

During the last several years cultural resource professionals and agencies have made important strides toward streamlining the compliance process. These include efforts like the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) Survey Report Summary Form (SRSF), the Government-to-Government Consultation Toolkit, and the use of new technologies for data collection and management in both the field and laboratory. The Arizona Archaeological Council invites panel members to discuss recent developments and future directions in the compliance process. The focus will be on increasing collaboration and functionality for stakeholders including private consultants, agency representatives, and tribal leaders in an ever-increasingly complex environment.
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Wind Catchers:  Sustainability In Traditional Iranian Architecture

Wind Catchers: Sustainability in Traditional Iranian Architecture

Sustainability! Today, architectural design is all about how to be environmentally correct and keep safe the natural elements. New technology has helped us to live at any habitat to overcome any severe weather condition. However, architecture was not always about using the concrete, metal many new materials used nowadays in building a structure. Looking to the history, Residential or commercial, Architects have been able to provide livable space merely with proper use of natural elements of light, water and wind. I am born in Iran and I completed my study in the field of architecture in my homeland where architecture was taught to students by practice and by word-of-mouth.
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SAH Archipedia: Identifying, Interpreting and Promoting Arizona’s 100 Most Significant Buildings

SAH Archipedia is an authoritative online encyclopedia containing thematic essays, histories and photographs of 100 buildings that are significant to and representative of the built environment of each of the 50 states. Published by the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) and University of Virginia Press, SAH Archipedia is a collaborative effort of architects, scholars, peer-reviewers, editors, photographers and others. Arizona’s contribution of 100 buildings is now complete, representing the work of a dozen team members and five years of effort. Three of SAH Archipedia Arizona’s project team members will present an outline of this comprehensive resource and how it can be used as a tool for promoting heritage tourism in Arizona.
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Hold that Demo: The City of Phoenix 30-day Stay of Demolition

In December 2016, the City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Office began implementing a 30-day hold before issuing demolition permits for commercial buildings 50 years of age or older, or buildings recommended as eligible for inclusion on the Phoenix Historic Property Register. Now that it has been in effect a little over a year, join City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Officer, Michelle Dodds, to find out why this process was established, how it is implemented, and what we have learned along the way.
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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West: Designing For The Desert Southwest

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West: Designing for the Desert Southwest

Established in 1937, and diligently handcrafted over many years into a world unto itself, Taliesin West was Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter home and studio. Deeply connected to the desert from which it was forged, Taliesin West possesses an almost prehistoric grandeur. It was built and maintained by Wright and his apprentices, making it among the most personal of the architect’s creations. This presentation will explore how Wright designed Taliesin West to be a site specific, Sonoran Desert structure through material choices and spatial organization.
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The Hotel Valley Ho: History, Redevelopment, And Rebirth

The Hotel Valley Ho: History, Redevelopment, and Rebirth

This session addresses the architect’s role in the process of the redevelopment of an architecturally and historically significant building: The Hotel Valley Ho. Topics of discussion will touch on the history and the ‘story’ of the original project including it’s architect, the acquisition, the research, working with the State Historic Preservation Office and the City of Scottsdale, the planning, design, repositioning and reopening of the iconic modernist building and its impacts on Downtown Scottsdale and the Valley’s hospitality industry.
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From Desert Pavement to Street Pavement: A Cultural Perspective on Modern Development and the Desert Landscape

This session will focus on the modern and cultural perspective on modern development and the desert landscape. Modern development as we all know changes the history and recognition of a place. The size of the impacts severely alters our connection to the desert landscape. It will touch on the negative impacts to traditional cultural properties and open a discussion for importance of preserving historical and cultural knowledge.
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Designing, Planning and Implementing Preservation: Case Studies from the Northern Periphery (Parts I and II)

The City of Scottsdale established the McDowell Sonoran Preserve (Preserve) to protect and conserve natural and cultural resources. The Cultural Resources Master Plan (CRMP) contributes to this goal by collating all archaeological site data and survey information for the 33,000-acre Preserve and identifying best management practices that would contribute to preservation of the multiple site types known to be present. The CRMP summarizes the preserve’s history, current status of information about the Preserve, the legal nexus establishing the Preserve, a recap of stakeholder meetings, best management practices for preservation and education using the Preserve, and recommendations for the Preserve, and specifically Brown’s Ranch.
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The Unexpected Mid-Century Gems of Chandler

Chandler, its design influenced by the City Beautiful Movement, is known for its early 20th century design exemplified by the San Marcos Hotel and the historic downtown. However, in this session, two Chandler residents shine a light on the city's relatively unknown mid-century architecture. Through vivid historic and contemporary photos and stories, they will guide you through Chandler's mid-century churches, commercial properties, and neighborhoods. You will also be introduced to a Chandler mid-century architect and developer. Then, follow along on the journey of an intrepid mid-century enthusiast who discovered and restored a hidden gem in a 1956 Chandler neighborhood.
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Not Just Empty Space:  Documentation Of Historic Streetscapes

Not Just Empty Space: Documentation of Historic Streetscapes

The National Register of Historic Places recognizes that streetscapes are an integral aspect of historic districts. Often omitted from nominations, alterations to these features may not trigger protective review. The presentation will describe the process of adapting a commercially-available app to inventory the features of a historic streetscapes. It will explain how city GIS information can be imported to serve as a basis for documentation and how volunteers recorded the significant features of their own neighborhood. Although examples will be drawn from Armory Park, the process itself is generic enough to be used by any historic neighborhood. A blueprint for customizing this tool for community-specific needs will be provided.
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Desert Modernism and Luxury Condominium Development in the Midcentury Era

Single-family detached housing has long been the American ideal, but the second decade of the post-World War Two era saw a rise in the number of multi-family housing starts. Many developers used Modernism to promote a sense of sophistication in their luxury condominium projects, but Valley architects adapted materials, plans, and forms to give a softer, more natural desert feel to contemporary Arizona architecture. This session discusses the development of luxury condominiums in the Valley in the midcentury era and defines Desert Modernism as applied to three case studies: Scottsdale Embassy (1962), Roman Roads (1964), and Mockingbird Northeast (1964).
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Detailing Desert Designs Since 2012: Arizona Contractor & Community Magazine

Detailing Desert Designs Since 2012: Arizona Contractor & Community Magazine

Arizona Contractor & Community magazine highlights new construction projects alongside articles about the rich history of the state’s building industry. The bi-monthly magazine distributes 5,200 copies to Arizona construction firms and municipalities. Despite the publication’s success, many architects and preservationists are unaware of this valuable resource, in circulation since 2012. Attendees will learn from the Editor, Douglas Towne, about the “perfect storm” that brought the magazine together and how to contribute to this vital forum. Architect and Columnist Douglas Sydnor FAIA will discuss Arizona architecture that is featured, and Historian Donna Reiner will present highlights of her well-researched subjects.
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Ensueños De Los Vaqueros: Insight From A Shaded Water Tank

Ensueños de los Vaqueros: Insight from a Shaded Water Tank

History, as a discipline, favors the written perspective, often at the expense of marginalized groups and what they might say. Researchers have a responsibility to pursue nontraditional sources of insight, an approach recently taken at Oracle State Park. Although the Kannally Ranch was owned by a wealthy Irish-American family, its cattle operation depended on local Mexican-American cowboys. The authors recently recorded hundreds of drawings and etchings on a water tank east of Oracle, using modern photographic techniques to digitally preserve an eroding glimpse into the past. Our study allows a candid look into the daily lives, cares, and priorities of individuals whose stories may otherwise remain in the shadows.
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La Posada Hotel: Inspiration For Preservation In The High Desert

La Posada Hotel: Inspiration for Preservation in the High Desert

When a small group of preservationists, led by Allan Affeldt, began restoring Winslow’s La Posada Hotel in 1997, they thought they were saving one building. But as La Posada gained recognition and economic success, it spurred other preservation efforts. The presenters will discuss the opportunities, challenges, and design elements of eight projects in Winslow and Las Vegas, New Mexico, as well as the dynamic local and state networks that have allowed these projects to evolve. They will also discuss the possibility that these projects may combine to form an extended downtown art complex, one that acknowledges the communities’ shared history along the Santa Fe Railway corridor. As the La Posada Hotel project progressed, the group’s non-traditional adaptive reuse plan evolved in organic ways. As related projects began to form, the overall focus shifted to include community planning, balancing historic preservation against economic concerns, working with local institutions to promote regional history and culture, and understanding the evolving nature of tourism in the Southwest. A flexible network of creative shareholders has grown and adapted to meet these challenges, addressing design issues on every level – from nuts-and-bolts like downtown traffic flow to the possibility that historic travel corridors might connect high desert communities in different states.
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Modernists Duel With The Desert

Modernists Duel with the Desert

In a fast-paced story of “cool” desert buildings, urban planner Erik Ryden dissects Desert Modernism to reveal a wondrous battle over style, science, and setting. First, learn a natural way to design for comfort in the dry desert heat. Then, take a journey with the modernist minds that gave rise to three great desert cities and their regional influence on Modernism. Finally, we explore the rise of Critical Regionalism in Phoenix by applying our new knowledge to the winner of The Sustainable Home Design Competition and its potential impact on development in The Valley.
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Design on Wheels: the Genesis of the Streamline Moderne Trailer

Since the early 1900s, travel trailers have allowed the most adventurous of us the comforts of home while experiencing the natural and scenic wonders of the United States. This presentation will focus on the design evolution of the earliest homemade “housetrailers” to the sleek, streamlined aluminum travel trailers of the 1930s, ending with an in-depth discussion of the first mass produced Art Moderne trailer, the Bowlus. Factors such as the rise of Art Moderne design; the beginning of the National Park system; the public’s fascination with motion, speed and science; and breakthroughs in industrial and automobile technology, will all be shown to have facilitated the nation’s wanderlust during this era.
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The 1957 Campaign To Preserve Wright’s Robie House

The 1957 Campaign to Preserve Wright’s Robie House

There are deep historical connections between your venue in Scottsdale and Frank Lloyd Wright. The preservation campaign on behalf of Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House in Chicago was unprecedented. It was the first time that the National Trust got involved in the preservation of a 20th century structure. The house was not even 50 years old when its owner, the Chicago Theological Seminary, decided to demolish the house. The successful 1957 campaign to preserve the Robie House soon loomed nearly as large in preservation history as the Robie House did in architectural history--a landmark in preservation history.
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Crowdsourcing: A New Design For Documenting Historic Resources

Crowdsourcing: A New Design for Documenting Historic Resources

In 2016, the Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation received a seed grant to begin the work of revising the historic property forms for the Barrio Viejo, the largest remaining collection of northern Sonoran adobe architecture in the United States. After working with community members to determine their participation, THPF posted a call for volunteers to document historic properties with the use of a cloud-based app. This session will explain the design of the project, the adaptation of a commercial app for historic documentation purposes, and the roles of professionals and volunteers in creating a new historic preservation model.
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The Digital Archive of Huhugam Archaeology

The Digital Archive of Huhugam Archaeology is an ongoing NEH funded project designed to locate, digitize, and make publicly available in tDAR grey literature reports related to Huhugam archaeology and prehistory. We will apply advanced digital humanities techniques to maximize the synthetic potential of this massive digital database, with implications for improved archaeological research, indigenous access to their cultural heritage, cultural resource management, and public outreach. This session includes members from research team, and will provide updates on project status and exciting initial results.
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Learn the Adaptive Reuse Process for Converting Two Mid-Century Office Buildings into a Luxury Hospitality Venue

Days after being named the Valley’s “hottest intersection” by the Urban Land Institute of Arizona, Vintage Partners (Uptown Plaza), Venue Projects (Windsor/Churn and The Orchard) and Arrive Hotel & Restaurants are set to bring another groundbreaking project to North Phoenix. Located on Camelback just west of “The Newton,” the 3 developers plan to create the Valley’s most exciting, innovative adaptive-reuse project of 2018. Learn how this project will combine two Midcentury Modern mid-rise buildings to create a 79-room hotel with a rooftop cocktail bar, as well as a poolside taco bar, gourmet ice cream bar, and coffee shop. It will provide details on how retention of historic buildings offer long-term benefits to cities and towns.
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Educational Opportunities For Cultural Resource Management In Arizona

Educational Opportunities for Cultural Resource Management in Arizona

The Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, with the assistance of the AZ SHPO, is developing an educational program for students, faculty, and professionals interested in expanding their knowledge of Cultural Resource Management in Arizona. This program encompasses multiple units that will be made available to the public at no cost via an online platform. Units include: Federal, state, and local preservation laws and protocols; permitting; developing research designs; developing historic contexts; Class III inventory; preparing testing and monitoring plans and conducting phased data recovery. This session outlines the goals and proposed format of the program and provides a sample instructional unit.
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Design Like A MoPho: Motifs Of Desert Modernism

Design Like a MoPho: Motifs of Desert Modernism

Discover how Phoenix’s midcentury modern design heritage fits into a larger scheme in a lavishly illustrated journey through the Modern Phoenix image archive. Learn how architecture, graphic design, illustration and photography by Arizona designers intersect to create a distinctly Desert Modern aesthetic. Take away a strong vocabulary so you can use the right terms that root us as desert-loving designers, historians and preservationists. Whether you’re new to Arizona or a longtime native, you’ll likely find something delightful that resonates in your retro heart.
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Where the Wash Comes Out: Indigenous and Euromerican Surficial Water Catchment along Queen Creek and its Tributaries

Archaeological investigations in the Queen Creek delta have identified a number of Hohokam reservoirs and catchment basins. Through the early twentieth century, the Soil Conservation Service constructed water control structures in the area in an effort to preserve ground cover and stem floodwater damage. This session provides a summary of archaeological investigations and archival research conducted for the Flood Control District of Maricopa County’s Powerline, Vineyard Road, and Rittenhouse Flood Retarding Structures rehabilitation, as well as earlier studies that reveal a long, temporal continuum of surficial water control by indigenous and Euromericans occupants of the Queen Creek bajada.
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Archaeological Design in Crisis: Current Perspectives on Research Design and Best Practices – Parts I and II

While Arizona archaeology has its roots in academia and research, private- and public-sector cultural resource management (CRM) projects supporting fast-paced economic growth, public works, and private development dominate the field today. Now, political and funding constraints have resulted in Curation and Data Management crises that undermine the ability of the profession to conduct scientific research using current methods and standards. The only way forward is to identify creative, scientifically- and fiscally-sound practices for archaeological research, sampling strategy, and field and laboratory methods, while better integrating Native American perspectives into all aspects of archaeological studies.
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Designing And Carrying Out Digital Curation For Data Management, Research, And Sharing Programs

Designing and Carrying Out Digital Curation for Data Management, Research, and Sharing Programs

Archaeology and historic preservation investigations and programs generate substantial amounts of digital data and information in digital formats. To take full advantage of these materials, they need to be curated actively and professionally. Like curation of physical objects and records, the curation of digital material requires that they be discoverable, accessible, usable, and preserved. This session includes summaries and examples of how digital curation is accomplished and digital data utilized by representatives of public organizations, private firms, and academics. Presenters will describe how their digital data are designed and organized for activities related to: resource management, public outreach, and research.
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Design in the Desert: The Perils, Pitfalls, and Successes of Cemetery Preservation Projects in a Desert Environment

A how-to on the proper research, planning, and implementation of a cemetery preservation project in a desert environment. As co-chairs for the AZ chapter of the Association for Gravestone Studies, we have spent many years traveling and studying cemeteries, gaining hands-on knowledge from top conservation experts in the field of cemetery preservation. This expertise was brought to a four-year, continuous preservation project at the Pioneer Military and Memorial Park for the Pioneers’ Cemetery Association, and this presentation will share some of the perils, pitfalls, and successes from the project. We will give tips on what worked and what does not work, and how to adapt preservation methods from other places to our arid environment.
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Problems, Pitfalls, and Economic Feasibility of Rehabilitating 19th and 20th Century Buildings in the 21st Century

Several 19th and 20th century buildings did not follow Codes, Rules, & Regulations. The workers constructed them to withstand fire, wind, & other elements of the weather making them safe for the public. They were built strong to survive for many years. In Rural Communities, today’s Staff are not familiar with these buildings and need training to appreciate the need for preserving them and safe for the public without jeopardizing the original design and having to meet all the current Codes, Rules, & Regulations. You will be shown how Architects Jim Garrison and Stephanie Rowe are addressing these problems & pitfalls. Gem Cox will discuss the Economic Feasibility of purchasing and rehabilitating historic buildings.
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Applying Photogrammetric Mapping Techniques To Historic Properties Documentation On The CO Bar Ranch

Applying Photogrammetric Mapping Techniques to Historic Properties Documentation on the CO Bar Ranch

Students and faculty with Northern Arizona University have recently employed new technologies to map, document, and assess historic and prehistoric cultural resources on Babbitt Ranches land northeast of Flagstaff, AZ. This session will discuss tests of digital photogrammetric mapping, drone mapping, RTK GPS mapping, and 3D modeling to complete Historic American Buildings Survey documentation and prepare National Register nominations for a prehistoric pueblo and historic ranch buildings. The project also serves to teach students applied analytical skills necessary for future careers in historic preservation and cultural resources management.
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Where Cantilever Meets Coyote: Postwar Architecture In Phoenix

Where Cantilever Meets Coyote: Postwar Architecture in Phoenix

Explosive growth of Phoenix in the postwar era made the central desert of Arizona a fertile palette for experimentation by some of the nation's greatest modern architects – including the giant of them all, Frank Lloyd Wright. Alison's richly illustrated and lively talk is packed with vintage imagery, legends and design philosophies of architects Al Beadle, Blaine Drake AIA, Ralph Haver AIA, Jimmie Nunn FAIA, Ed Varney FAIA, Paolo Soleri and Fred Guirey FAIA. All were contemporaries of Wright. For those with an already strong understanding of the time period and its designers, the intertwining of their professional lives and current events in their lifetime will be described in a way that helps knit their stories together.
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The Indian Bend Wash – Creating a Greenbelt Out of the Desert

The Indian Bend Wash Greenbelt project was truly the first of its kind. This project had to rise above skepticism and find ways to solve engineering and other problems that had not been addressed before. As A multi-use project, it had to accommodate a wide range of functions, including flood control, recreational amenities, community services, relocated neighborhoods and major utility corridors. It also needed to overcome the challenge of many different owners, who have different interests and abilities to maintain and operate the facilities. this project became a model that has been reviewed by others across the state, across the nations and around the world.
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From Fire to Empire – The Remarkable Story of the Buckhorn Baths

The story of the Buckhorn Baths is a remarkable tale of changing circumstances, fortuitous discovery and innovative enterprise - all converging as if by destiny at the same time and place. The mtroduct1on of the automobile in the early 20th century, provided Americans with a mobility that the horse and buggy could not achieve. Long distance travel in personal conveyances became possible in just a few short years. The Homestead Act of 1862 provided many Arizona settlers an opportunity to own land and start a life in the West. The first permanent structure was erected at the Buckhorn in 1936 with bricks purchased from the demolished Mesa Irving School (old North School ca. 1894. See what Ted and Alice Sliger did in the Arizona desert.
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Curating the Arizona Landscape

Curating the Arizona Landscape explores the issues involved with using mobile and digital technologies to curate the landscapes as living museums. The presentation examines the promises of using digital tools to expand historic preservation but also considers the limitations of curating landscape. The presentation will be grounded by introducing Salt Rivers Stories (http://saltriverstories.org/), a mobile interpretive project developed at ASU. Attendees will learn about the tools and techniques of curating landscape by engaging the interpretive challenges facing the Salt River Stories team. The presentation will be interactive and the audience will be invited to brainstorm solutions and contribute their insights.
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Interpreting the Historic Assets of the Salt River Project

Salt River Project (SRP) embarked on an effort to evaluate and preserve its historic resources and engage in the broader conversation on historic preservation. SRP has interpreted its canal system for decades, and is exploring ways to interpret more of its historic assets for the public. As a result, SRP recently documented the historic resources that make up SRP’s water and power systems. This session will outline the process to document and catalog historic assets from artifacts to infrastructure, including existing public art and interpretive signage and discuss the use of this documentation to develop platforms to allow public access to information on these sites, which played a critical role in the development of the Valley and SRP.
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Arizona Department Of Emergency And Military Affairs (AZDEMA): Archaeological Proactive Planning – Part I

Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZDEMA): Archaeological Proactive Planning – Part I

The Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZDEMA), a division of the Arizona Army National Guard, is responsible for managing cultural resources on approximately 60,000 acres of land across Arizona. AZDEMA has an active program with multiple contractors to inventory, evaluate, manage, and either avoid or mitigate adverse effects on significant historic properties on its lands. This first of two sessions offers insight and information on various proactive AZDEMA programs to fulfill its responsibilities under state and federal laws. This includes the creation of an interactive relational database to manage resources, design of a streamlined cultural resource management plan, and the creation of agreement documents.
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Arizona Department Of Emergency And Military Affairs (AZDEMA): Alternative, Supplemental Approaches To Section 106 – Part II

Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZDEMA): Alternative, Supplemental Approaches to Section 106 – Part II

The Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZDEMA), a division of the Arizona Army National Guard, is responsible for managing cultural resources on approximately 60,000 acres of land across Arizona. This second of two sessions discusses AZDEMA’s innovative program to examine efficiency and effectiveness through alternative and supplemental approaches to its state and federal regulatory requirements. This program includes a study of surface and sub-surface investigations through multiple lines of evidence to examine and assess traditional techniques and how they can be improved.
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Sharing The Wisdom Of Desert Designs Past: Building Upon A Century Of Arizona Architects’ Drawings

Sharing the Wisdom of Desert Designs Past: Building upon a Century of Arizona Architects’ Drawings

For the past three years, a small group of Arizona architects, archivists, and historians have joined forces to Identify and save that part of our architectural heritage that has often been lost in dumpsters. The group actively seeks out important private holdings of Arizona architects to stem this loss of design records. Don Ryden will discuss Wise Designs for the Desert, John Jacquemart notes the value for We Seekers of Wisdom, and Donna Reiner explains how to Conserve Design Documents Wisely. The three committee members will share what has been saved and where many other drawings are located.
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Research Design and Best Practices: Working with Tribes

Non-native archaeological professionals working within Tribal cultural resource programs are in a unique position to influence and comment on best practices for equitably integrating the Native American perspective into science based archaeological research, sampling strategies, field methods and analyses, as well as providing alternative interpretation of the collected data. This session about Research Design and Best Practices explores this relationship and includes presenters from the Cocopah Indian Tribe, the Pueblo of Zuni, the Hualapai Tribe, and the Hopi Tribe.
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Challenges Of Historic Landscapes: Defining Meaning And Values For Preservation

Challenges of Historic Landscapes: Defining Meaning and Values for Preservation

The landscape of Agua Caliente Park in Tucson Arizona has been many things to many people: a ranch, commercial-sized farm, sanitarium, resort, and, finally, a county park. At its heart, a remarkable spring supported 100 acres of crops, 8 individual lakes, and many residents. It was privately owned by 20 different families but the Tucson community has historically viewed this landscape with its oasis-like vegetation as a public space of recreation. Following Pima County’s acquisition in 1984, management and restoration have been challenged by shifting geologies, climate change, invasive plants and animals, and divergent needs and desires between county administration and the neighboring community. This talk will examine how users hold differing values and meaning in the same landscape. Restoration of a historic landscape varies in the eye of each beholder and his or her experience with that site. Unlike buildings, historic landscapes are not static, design is an ongoing action. Over the last 30 years, Pima County has worked hard to juggle ecological needs, vegetation maintenance, and the preservation of the landscape and most of its historic aspects.
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